Generate wood patterns with temperature changes

Created by MoonCactus, source
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mooncactus
created 04/01/14 16:09


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Script to generate texture via temperature gradients to get horizontal stripes that "look like wood".

Update: this script is now available as a simpler webservice here: tecrd.com/page/liens/stl_wood&lang=fr (with no support for huge files though).

The owl is Cushwa's popular design at thingiverse.com/thing:18218

It was printed here with LAYWOO-D3 wood filament thingiverse.com/thing:30552
It works also somehow with some other filament (just tweak the temperature), with a less drastic effect.

This is a piece of source code of mine, originally made for Skeinforge within Cura 12.08, now part of the official releases, and is now also an independent standalone Python script.

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Instructions

This is the code of my post here: betterprinter.blogspot.fr/2012/10/shades-of-brown-with-wood-filament-via.html

_
Last updates:
Sun Jul 7 21:43:12 UTC 2013
- web service hosted on tecrd.com/page/liens/stl_wood&lang=fr
Tue Feb 12 08:35:53 UTC 2013
- more readable ASCII art plot
- can be re-run on itself, it will no more duplicate the commands and graph
- fixed a bug in the numeric arguments (thanks to Fused3D)
_

This script was an official plugin in Cura (version 12.11+). Check it here: wiki.ultimaker.com/CuraPlugin:_Wood Thanks to Daid for porting my old Skeinforge/Cura version to the new and much cleaner plugin system. The tgz archive could be useful only to Skeinforge users or old-timers of Cura. Better ignore it ;)

After multiple requests and at last, I finally converted it to a standalone Python script that no more needs Cura nor Skeinforge. I documented the process here by the way: betterprinter.blogspot.fr/2013/02/how-tun-run-python-cura-plugin-without.html

You'll need Python on your computer. Then run the woodstandalone.py script as follows:

python wood
standalone.py --min minTemp --max maxTemp --grain grainSize --file gcodeFile

or in brief mode:

python wood_standalone.py -i minTemp -a maxTemp -g grainSize -f gcodeFile

This will "patch" your gcode file in place (it will be modified), so keep a backup if you need one.
- minTemp is the minimum temperature to use (the code ensures that it is reached)
- maxTemp is the maximum temperature to use (the code ensures that it is reached)
- grainSize lets you tweak the "average thickness" of the layers
The gcodeFile is the only compulsory parameter.

Initial temperature settings will be overridden by the varying pattern that is generated by this script (a variant of recursive Perlin noise). You can run it multiple times to test different values and generated temperature curve until you like it.

Default values are minTemp=190, maxTemp=240 and grainSize=3. Higher themperature give darker bands (due to the wood being burnt). Do not let the wood stay too long in your nozzle else you will most probably clog it with carbon!

Finally, to run it on windows you may want to check the FAQ here: docs.python.org/2/faq/windows.html


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Latest Changes

Jan 04, 2014

  • Add file wood3.py
    By mooncactus at 16:09
  • Add file wood2.py
    By mooncactus at 16:09
  • Add file linux-cura-12.08-wood-patch-20130207-083137.tgz
    By mooncactus at 16:09
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