Revised Fully Printable Eggbot

Created by Glasswalker, source
  3D view
3D Compare
mirror
created 18/11/13 08:53


Download shape

This is a fully printable eggbot, which was inspired by the original Eggbot as well as the other designs by Zaggo and Berserker.

I designed this one to be complete, and fully printable. And easily assembled. Also all parts are no larger than 100mm in any direction so should be printable on any 3D Printer out there. Lastly I wanted to keep the amount of plastic used to a minimum where possible.

It's intended to be printed in PLA on my Ultimaker.

It's unfinished in that I haven't printed it myself to test it. Normally I don't release things until they are "done" but since Easter is coming up fast, I thought I better get this one out there so hopefully some others can build one in time. I'm hoping to make mine this weekend, and will post pics once it's assembled.

It's intended to be used with the spherebot electronics and firmware. thingiverse.com/thing:7656

Hope you enjoy!

EDIT April 2 2012:
I've refined some of the parts. Updated STLs are uploaded. The Egg cup parts didn't work out as planned, replaced them with suction cup based ones. Also I strengthened and thickened up the Back Plate part as it was a little flimsy (still works in it's original form, as I left it on mine, but I figured it could use some strengthening for general use).

EDIT April 4 2012:
Ok another minor revision to a few parts. I've uploaded the new designs now. Also here are some pics of the finished build. I'm still just wrapping up the electronics. The changes I made were shortening the egg cup holders to allow for a larger egg to fit, and I had to adjust the arm pivot to allow the motor shaft to protrude through it. You will need washers on those screws now but it will allow a better depth adjustment for the pen to allow it to center up nicely on the egg (keeping the image from skewing when you print it).

EDIT April 4 2012:
Sketchup Sources uploaded.

User Prints

If you printed this shape, share it!

I printed this!

Instructions

These are rough instructions since I have yet to build it myself, these will be updated once I've verified the build:

You will need:
2x NEMA17 Stepper motors
1x 9g hobby servo (Turnigy TG9e or HXT900 is what it was designed for)
All electronics for Spherebot (see link above)
2x 608ZZ "Skate Bearings"
Some M8 Threaded Rod
Several M8 Nuts
Several M4 screws and nuts
A few M4 washers
Some childrens suction darts (see photo, like nerf darts)
A spring (8mm internal diameter, and as long as you need for your frame size)
A Sharpie (fine tip)
An egg or small ball to draw on

Printed parts:
1x Back plate
2x End plates
1x Egg cup drive
1x Egg cup idle
1x Idler knob (optional to cover sharp ends of rod if kids will use)
2x Idler Bearing Plate
1x Pen Arm Shaft Coupler
1x Pen Arm Pivot
1x Pen Arm Top

Assembly:
- Put 2 threaded rods through the back plate and tighten it down with nuts so it's in the center.
- Assemble the two end plates using threaded rods through the 2 bottom, and the rear top hole (the motor mounts face the "front" side) So that the rear plate is between the 2 back plates. The completely flat side of the rear plate should face forward (with the "bumpy side" facing the rear of the machine)
- bolt the motors onto the NEMA17 mount on one end plate (doesn't matter which) and the rear plate.
- Press fit the egg drive cup onto the end motor
- Press fit the arm shaft coupler onto the rear motor
- Use an M4 nut and short screw to lock the shaft coupler onto the rear motor (the egg cup is just friction fit)
- Fit 2 M4 nuts into the trapped nut slots on the shaft coupler, and then use line up the arm pivot and put 2 M4 screws through the slots into the trapped nuts (just loose for now you can adjust later)
- Use an M4 screw, a couple washers in the middle, and a nut to create the hinge between the arm pivot and arm top parts. Tighten only minimally to allow free swinging with no resistance (use nylock nut or locktite to keep it from falling off)
- drop an M4 nut into the arm top trapped nut hole near the end, and thread an M4 screw into it via the setscrew hole, this is for tightening onto the pen
- Install the servo in the provided bracket on the arm pivot, so that the servo horn is inline with the arm top and can push it up and down with a little rotation.
- press fit 2 608 bearings into the bearing plates (these should be tight, so you may need a little tape depending on your printed parts)
- use 4x (or even 2x) M4 screws to screw the bearing plates in place of the second end plate's NEMA17 motor mount (make sure it's centered)
- Feed a length of M8 rod through the bearings. it just sits loose
- Thread (just twist the plastic part on the hole is just a little too small so it should thread onto the rod with some moderate force) the egg cup idler onto one end of the idler rod
- Fit the spring between the idler cup and the bearing block. It should provide minimal force against the drive cup when empty, and should have enough strength to hold the egg without breaking it.
- Screw the idler knob on the other end of the idler rod.
- Attach the rubber suction cup portion on the end of the egg cup parts
- Fit a sharpie, and wire up the electronics and you should be good to go!


Tags

Comments

You must be logged in to comment, log in now
back_plate.stl
(ver 1)

egg_cup_drive.stl
(ver 1)

egg_cup_idle.stl
(ver 1)


idler_bearing_plate.stl
(ver 1)

idler_knob.stl
(ver 1)

pen_arm_pivot.stl
(ver 1)

pen_arm_shaft_coupler.stl
(ver 1)

pen_arm_top.stl
(ver 1)

Latest Changes

Nov 18, 2013

  • Add file egg_cup_idle.stl
    By mirror at 08:53
  • Add file pen_arm_shaft_coupler.stl
    By mirror at 08:53
  • Add file idler_knob.stl
    By mirror at 08:53
  • Add file end_plate.stl
    By mirror at 08:53
  • Add file idler_bearing_plate.stl
    By mirror at 08:53
network map more

Forks

Be the first one to fork this shape Fork

Likes

Print Tag

If you printed this shape, please give your attribution by print this tag

Shape Tag
  1. Welcome Tutorial - The shape page

    This is a shape page, a shape can contain one or more STL files as well as extra instructions helper files..
    Press Next to continue.

  2. This is the shape gallery. Like in many sites you can see a 3D view of this shape by clicking the "3D view" button. This button appears when an image is linked to an STL file.

  3. In case you missed it, this download button would let you download the shape.

  4. Here comes the magic of ShapeDo, lets start by forking this shape.
    Forking a shape creates a full copy of the shape in your account, one which you an edit and improve on.
    Try forking this shape!

  1. Welcome Tutorial - The shape page

    This is a shape page, a shape can contain one or more STL files as well as extra instructions helper files..
    Press Next to continue.

  2. This is the shape gallery. Like in many sites you can see a 3D view of this shape by clicking the "3D view" button. This button appears when an image is linked to an STL file.

  3. In case you missed it, this download button would let you download the shape.

  4. Here comes the magic of ShapeDo, lets start by forking this shape.
    Forking a shape creates a full copy of the shape in your account, one which you an edit and improve on.

  5. Note there are extra details calculated for the shape, such as volume and file size, useful for when you want to print.

  6. Shapes can have many revisions, here you can see the version count with the latest first. By clicking on the version you can see live what has been changed in the 3D viewer or download older versions.

  7. This box will show you the history of changes made on this shape.

  8. You can see a visual representation of the history by clicking on the "network map" link, the "network map" shows the entire fork and shape history, its a powerful tool finding the exact version you want, and seeking who has the latest changes. You can also view it by clicking on the 'forks' message at the top of the page

  9. This box will show the users who forked this shape. Forks can take shapes in unusual directions.

  10. Don't forget to upload your shapes and thanks for participating our tour. We can't wait to see what you will create!

  11. Your feedback is important, please take a minute to make us get better.

  1. Congratulations

    You have created your first fork, good job!
    You made your first important step.

    Lets continue our tour...

  2. This shape is yours, you can edit and update it in any way you want.

    You can get new changes from other users that forked the original shape by pulling from them. Using the arrow on the right of the edit button opens the pull action.

    When you make changes and want to contribute back to the origin, just use the merge request to create a request to the original author. They will get an e-mail that their shape has a request, they can comment on it in case a change needs to be made.

  3. You can see here where the shape was forked from and who will get the request.

  4. Note there are extra details calculated for the shape, such as volume and file size, useful for when you want to print.

  5. Shapes can have many revisions, here you can see the version count with the latest first. By clicking on the version you can see live what has been changed in the 3D viewer or download older versions.

  6. This box will show you the history of changes made on this shape.

  7. You can see a visual representation of the history by clicking on the "network map" link, the "network map" shows the entire fork and shape history, its a powerful tool finding the exact version you want, and seeking who has the latest changes. You can also view it by clicking on the 'forks' message at the top of the page

  8. This box will show the users who forked this shape. Forks can take shapes in unusual directions.

  9. Don't forget to upload your shapes and thanks for participating our tour. We can't wait to see what you will create!

  10. Your feedback is important, please take a minute to make us get better.