Quadcopter Hummingbird II

Created by jkrassman, source
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created 07/11/13 15:27


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Print it, Build it - and Fly it!

Yet another quadcopter, i know :)

Let me present "Hummingbird II" the Opensource Quadcopter to you - the beginners quad!

The idea to this Quadcopter came up when I was trying to printout my first quad designed by other people, here on Thinginverse. I stumbled into a lot of problems with design flaus and other stuff that wasn't so well designed. No offence to all the other designers! So I satt down and started to design my own Quadcopter - and Hummingbird was born. Hummingbird is designed in Autodesk Inventor and the files are attached to this project. I am a beginner with Inventor so if there are any one that is an experienced Inventor user out here, feel free for correcting some minor things in the sketch, please do! I can upload other format of files depending on the export function in Inventor. I want the copter to be easy to maintain and assembly. If you break a leg, you just print a new leg, not the whole arm.

The design is targeted for PLA prints and for the Replicator II & X, and all dimensions for holes etc, are dimensioned so if the plastic shrinks, there is enough room for the screws to get clearance. All parts except from the motormount & and the boardplate (Flightcontroller & receiver) doesn't need any support when printed.

So you dont have to work with the print that much - just screw it togheter and fly!

The arms is made out of an Aluminium tube 15 x 15 x 1.5 millimeter. The tube I got was a little bit over 15 milimeters so I made all the connections a little bit larger. If they are to large, put some tape around the arms - and you will be fine. You maybe wonder why the arms is not printed? There are several of problems when printing long objects and I never managed to get one arm 100% straight and even if it is straight, PLA could be affected by heat and screw them up. Therefore I decided to use alluminum for the arms. Cheap and easy to get hold of and very durable and stiff. Have you ever heard of a scew BP? Me either :)

The Quad is built upon the base. The base acts as a mounting box for the arms and holds all cables so that it looks neat and pretty - fully assembled. Quads and other multicopter often looks uggly so I tried to design this copter so that the majority of cables is hidden. The base is a rigid design and all walls have a chamfer to be strong. Once screwed togheter with the lid, I cant manage to twist it by hand. It is very rigid and will survive many crashes. The nice feature of the bottom is that is got marks on the undercarrige, so you know where to balance your CG - very handy when you want to balance this machine!

Below the base is the Batteryholder and it has a unique feature as well. It is adjustable so that you can get an accurate CG (Center of Gravity) point. This means that you can use the base and batteryholder even if you are adding a lot of uneven payload to your Quadcopter. Move your battery to get the perfect CG. You maybe want to start out with an empty Quad and then attach a camera, FPV kit or something else. You can traverse the batterypack over 80 millimeters - so you can always get it in perfect balance.

Esc holders slots on to the arm and locks with a tieband.

Motormounts does have a unique feature. The place where the cables comes out from the motor, is a weak point if you crash, and it is easy to destroy the motor since that the copperwire from the motor's stator is used as cable in the most common motors. Just put a tieband around the cables here and you get some extra protection for your brushless motor. Saves you money if a crash happens - it will happen!

Flightcontroller /Receiver addon. I am using KK2 as for flightcontrol and the plate is attached to the mainbody by a snap fit. The flightcontroller is screwed by small hobby screws onto the plate. Receiver is attached by a strip on the back of the plate. This is something that could redesigned to fit other controllers/receivers. This mounting board is designed for Optima 7 receivers.


Legs, nothing special here - just print them and do some extra spares for your crashes :)



This is the parts list from Hobbyking and other stores that I have bought things to make this beauty fly! If it is a hobbyking part, you will see their partnumber below.

PARTDESC#NOQuantity

Motors AX-2810Q-750KV0470000044 pcs
ESCTurnigy Plush 25ATR_P25A4 pcs
LIPOTurnigy 4C 4.5AmpN4500.4S.251 pcs
Propps10x4.5 Carbon-----4 pcs
FlightcontrollerKK291710000731 pcs
1-> 4 CableHobbyking0150000981 pcs
Individual HXT 3.5mm connector for motor/ESC2580000014 pcs
Servo cables10 cm long-----5 pcs
15X15 Alluminium bar220 mm long-----4 pcs


You will also need a transmitter and receiver. I am using a Aurora 9 for this little machine!

So let's get creative and design cool addons and variations for this Quad - and fly tight!

Regards, Joakim

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Instructions

Print all things with an infill of 40% and a shell of 2. Some parts need support and those are the motor mounts, legs, and the mount plate for the controller and receiver.The spacer for the batteryholder should be glued together so that it is easy to mount.

Updates:
--------------------
2013-10-18
A new leg is added to this design that handles bad landings better. The first version was a little bit weak.



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Latest Changes

Nov 07, 2013

  • Add file hb_chassi_2.stl
    By mirror at 15:27
  • Add file hb_battpack_spacer.stl
    By mirror at 15:27
  • Add file hb_esc_holder.stl
    By mirror at 15:27
  • Add file hb_chassi_lid_2.stl
    By mirror at 15:27
  • Add file hb_legs.stl
    By mirror at 15:27
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